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Working Your Mission

Some people call it purpose, others term it a calling. Lovenia and Evelyn call it a mission. These two ladies are the founders of Working Your Mission, an inspirational/motivational company that encourages people to identify their passion, purpose, calling, mission or whatever term you use to label it, and then work it until it becomes their livelihood.

This is a topic that is cradled in my heart. I feel very strongly about people stepping out of their comfort zone to embrace that for which they live and breathe. I talk about this in depth with Lovenia and Evelyn, and you can listen to our conversation by clicking on the Working Your Mission link.

If you have a mission that you’ve been thinking of shaping into a business, or if you need to be sustained as you work your mission, or if you just want to pick up some really wise words of instruction, then you’ll want to subscribe to Working Your Mission. Regardless, Lovenia, Evelyn and I are rooting for you. You can do it!

A big THANK YOU to Lovenia and Evelyn for the great conversation and for working their own mission. God bless you ladies!

The Literary Origins of Valentine’s Day

Something new I learned.

Interesting Literature

Did Geoffrey Chaucer invent Valentine’s Day? Yes and no.

St Valentine’s Day has been marked in liturgical calendars for centuries. As a Christian feast day, Valentine’s Day actually commemorates two Saint Valentines: Valentine of Rome and Valentine of Terni. (The Catholic Encyclopedia even speaks of a third Saint Valentine, who was martyred in Africa, but little else is known about him.)

Chaucer1But Valentine’s Day only became associated with romantic love during the late fourteenth century, when Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1343-1400), author of The Canterbury Tales, made the association in his poem ‘The Parlement of Foules’, written some time in the 1380s, possibly in 1382. The poem features a parliament, or assembly, of birds, which have gathered together in order to choose their mates. As Chaucer’s narrator remarks, ‘For this was on seynt Volantynys day / Whan euery bryd comyth there to chese his make.’ However, several of Chaucer’s contemporaries also wrote poems…

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Cinco de Mayo Giveaway on Sunday, May 5th.

Enjoy with your blood red margarita…

Sumiko Saulson

ImageThose of you who have read “The Moon Cried Blood” already know that it’s central protagonist, 13 year old Tisha is a young lady of African American and Mexican American heritage living in Los Angeles in the mid 1970s. In this gritty work of dark fantasy and urban fiction, the teen comes to know that she is one of a long line of witches called “Luna” whose powers are connected to the cycles of the moon.

Here is the official description of the book:

It is said that the Wolf may howl at the Moon, but Imagethe Moon never howls at the Wolf. In the gritty urban streets of Los Angeles in 1975, Leticia Gordon is forced to come to terms with many things: the tragic death of her stepmother and baby sister in a car accident, fear she’ll wind up in foster care, and the sudden revelation she belongs…

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Some Literary Facts in Honour of World Book Night

Today is International World Book Day! I found this interesting and thought I would share. Read on…

Interesting Literature

Today, 23 April, is World Book Night (sometimes known, confusingly, as World Book Day). It is also the birthday (according to convention; nobody knows for sure) of William Shakespeare, and also the date on which he died, in 1616. On different calendars, Miguel de Cervantes (author of Don Quixote) and William Wordsworth also died on this day, in 1616 and 1850 respectively. In honour of this literary event, we thought we’d compile 23 literary facts about the world of books, poetry, plays, novels, and other bookish delights for you to revel in and share today. We hope you enjoy them!

World1

The first detective novel in English is often said to be The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins (1868). However, The Notting Hill Mystery (which, sadly, doesn’t feature Hugh Grant in Victorian gaiters going around on a killing spree) got there first, in 1862-3. The author of this – the bona fide

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Turning the Page!

Welcome!

In 1995, my first book After Hours was published. Since then, my writing career has been as unpredictable as the weather. I thought I would continue in the romance genre forever, but four romance novels and one novella later (all written under my pen name of Anna Larence) I found myself wanting to stretch as a writer.

I turned down a publishing contract so I could focus on learning the mechanics of prose fiction, script and non-fiction writing. I took so many classes at community colleges, universities and through writers groups that if I added all the class hours I would have another degree.

To apply my new knowledge, I switched my professional career from telecommunications to corporate communications, taking on such roles as staff writer, associate editor, public relations specialist and marketing manager. While I enjoyed these positions, something was still missing, and I realized that if I wanted to be authentic and truly happy, I needed to be a full-time fiction writer. So I quit, walked away from corporate (a second time) to write the stories that were simmering in my heart and mind.

Regardless of whether I am crafting a short story, novel, article, novella, essay or script, I am happy and fulfilled. And because I know firsthand from my work in communications the influence and power the written word has in effecting people, I take time and care with my words more so than in the past.

Lovers of words, word crafters, and fans of great storytelling…you’re all invited to join me in this world that I love—the world of books, words, reading and writing.