Tag Archive | books

Amreeka = America = The World

In recent days, we’ve been bombarded with news stories of the fallout of Trump’s decision to halt refugee resettlement efforts, stop refugee entry, totally ban Syrian refugees and step up deportation. Stories of people stranded, handcuffed, turned away, stripped from their children and deposited at the Mexico border with nothing but the clothes on their backs. These stories, like the decision that started all this coverage, were hard to digest. I was angered, frustrated and at times, sad, lacking hope. As I often do when distressed, I sink into books. I find that reading helps me to either recenter or escape (and regroup later when I emerge). I opened my reader, hoping to find my center, and scanned the various unread titles. I ran across this one, A Country Called Amreeka: U. S. History Retold through Arab-American Lives. How appropriate at a time like this, I thought and hurriedly launched the book.

alia-malek

This non-fiction book by Alia Malek is a history book (covering the ’40s through the early 2000s) told in parallel. One parallel track is the Arab-American version of history as told from the perspective of various Arab-Americans who lived the history and the other parallel track is the American political/media version as reported by news outlets and governmental agencies. I purchased the book last November (2016) after meeting the author and hearing her speak. Back then, I was impressed with her message on inclusion and unification, and her thorough knowledge of U.S. and Middle East history. But since reading her book, I have been more impressed with her ability to educate me. In Amreeka, the Arab-American word for America, I have deepened my knowledge of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, the struggles Arab-Americans have had in America, and how slanted news reporting can be. Also, through her thorough and insightful education, I have been reminded of what powerful tools “hope” and “prayer” can be.

I have not finished the book yet but already I am telling everyone I know to read it. It’s a heart-opener for those who need a reminder that all people are worthy of fair and equal treatment regardless of skin color, religion or national origin. It’s an educational lift for those who rely solely on mainstream media/news sources, and it’s an eye-widener for those who thought they knew the ins and outs of our American political/media system.

Again, the book is, “A Country Called Amreeka:  U. S. History Retold through Arab-American Lives” by Alia Malek or visit http://www.aliamalek.com/ for more details.

Now is the time to live for others, to fight for all!

September / Fall / Love / Giveaways

Finally, September…septemberMy favorite of all months.
I love September for it ushers in Fall.
I love September for offering a three-day respite from labor.
I love September for serving as a pre-cursor to the holidays -soon to come.
I love September for its religious significance; a reminder to fast and pray.
I love that it teases us with thoughts of egg nog ice cream and pumpkin muffins.
I love that within its dates fall the state fair and the PV/Grambling football game.
I love that it’s the ninth month (an indication of completion).
I love that it’s my birth month!
September is so sweet and so is Fall…
My favorite of all seasons.
I love the cooler temperatures.
I love the cooler fashions.
I love having the option of writing indoors or out.
I love the vibrant colors—the reds, oranges, browns, yellows, blacks and whites.
I love replacing manufactured air with God’s air.
I love the magnolia cones that litter my yard
And the pecan shells that stain my driveway.
I love the sound of the high school marching band; practice session ended but echoing notes still fill my street.
Finally, Fall…

To celebrate the arrival finally of two of my loves, September and Fall, I am giving stuff away!
Well, not stuff; rather, books. Lyrical Darkness to be exact. Three copies.

If you’d like a chance to win one of my love gifts, simply email me at afields121@yahoo.com by September 30th. Use the subject line “Happy Birthday.” (Don’t worry. If you forget to use that subject line, I’ll still scour my Inbox for entries.) At midnight on the 30th, I will toss all email addresses in a basket, draw out three and send the winners an ebook version of Lyrical Darkness. It’s just that simple!

NOTE: If you’d like to improve your chances of winning or would prefer a hard copy (instead of ebook), visit Goodreads where I am running a parallel giveaway that begins on September 6th.

Enjoy September!

Enjoy Fall!

Enjoy Reading!

June 21st Came and Went

June 21st came and went and me with no summer reading list. Summer Reading

I took a breather from handling my mom’s medical appointments, traveling, marketing the new book and making a major technology transition and realized the summer solstice had come.

And me with no summer reading list.

I looked up from painting my house, writing book reviews, crying about human losses, bemoaning all the rain, and making beautiful memories with my four-year-old nephew and realized summer had arrived.

And me with no summer reading list.

I paused from texting friends, making friends, losing friends and hanging with friends to say “good-bye June; hello July.”

And me with no summer reading list.

So dear readers, I have no choice but to lean on you. Would you kindly suggest a book or two? Good summer reads that will keep me company until the fall. Books I can read on the coast, on a plane, at coffee or lunch, in the office or at the park. Stories I can fall into and linger at the end. Tales I can, in turn, pay it forward and share with friends.

For your very generous reply, I promise to pray a fun, relaxing, book-filled summer for you and yours.

And now me, with a summer reading list!

Black Literary Facts – 2014

Another February has come and with its arrival another opportunity to meet more Black writers and receive an introduction (or maybe re-introduction) to their works. Some of these writers I have met; others I have not. But, all impressed me with their talent and/or successes. I hope you enjoy reading about these impressive writers and that you’ll be inspired to read some or all of their works. Enjoy Black History Month and Black Literary Facts!

Leslie Esdaile Banks – With more than 60 works to her credit, Banks is best known for her Vampire Huntress Legend series and her romance novels.

Eleanor Taylor Bland – As a mystery novelist, Bland’s focus was to “give voice to those normally without a voice.” Marti MacAlister is the heroine in her eleven-book MacAlister detective series.

Charles W. Chesnutt – Author and essayist, Chestnutt wrote novels and short stories dealing with race and social identity during the post Civil War.

Donald Crews – A two-time Caldecott Honor winner, Crews authored the children’s books Freight Train and Truck.

Eric Jerome Dickey – This New York Times bestselling author has penned over twenty novels that feature strong female characters in lead roles.

Percival Everett – He is a poet, novelist and short story writer as well as the recipient of the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, Believer Book Award, the PEN and numerous other awards.

Sharon G. Flake – This writer is a Publisher’s Weekly favorite. She is a young adult literary writer whose goal is to give hope, foster beliefs and encourage dreams.

Ernest Gaines – A National Endowment for the Arts recipient, Gaines has had several of his novels adapted to film, the most popular being The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman and A Lesson Before Dying.

Marita Golden – Author of 14 works of fiction and nonfiction, she has received the Black Caucus of the American Library Association Honor Award and the Literary Award for Fiction for After.

Eloise Greenfield began writing children’s book because “far too few books told the truth about African-American people.” Her writings reflect her seriousness in telling the truth of her people.

Francis Ray – Romance novelist and short story writer who penned more than 50 books. She was an award winning, bestselling writer as well as the creator of a foundation to help victims of domestic abuse.

bell hooksAin’t I a Woman? is the title of this author’s work which greatly influenced contemporary feminist thought. She has also written literature for young people.

Elliott Eli Jackson – This author, poet and speaker writes nonfiction books, blogs and essays on spirituality and healing. He is a frequent speaker at conferences.

Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr. is a Harvard professor and the author of 16 books. In addition, he is affiliated with The Root, a daily online magazine.

Jesse C. Jackson – A young adult novelist whose stories focused on minorities forced to integrate a white environment is best known for Call Me Charley and Tessie.

Etheridge Knight – This poet wrote multiple books of poetry during the time of the Black Arts Movement. He was engaged with such notables as Amiri Baraka, Haki Madhubuti, and Sonia Sanchez.

Alain Locke – A Rhodes Scholarship winner, Locke’s writings and focus was on African and African American literature and writers. He wrote The New Negro, which is a classic.

John Marrant – In 1785, his pamphlet, A Narrative of the Lord’s Wonderful Dealings with John Marrant, a Black, was published and was so popular it was reprinted many times.

Brandon Massey – This award winning author of horror and suspense has published novels and short story collections. His works also appear in anthologies.

Richard Bruce Nugent – A popular figure during the Harlem Renaissance, his novel Gentleman Jigger was published in 2008, 70 years after it was written.

ZZ PackerDrinking Coffee Elsewhere was this author’s international bestseller. She has published frequently in The New Yorker and Granta.

Gordon Parks – Best known as the most important black photographer of our time, he is also the first African American to write and direct a Hollywood feature film, The Learning Tree based on his novel.

Alvin F. Poussaint – This author has written several nonfiction books on parenting, crime and other contemporary issues. In addition, he has an impressive list of articles on the same topics.

Willis Richardson – A playwright during the ’20s and ’30s, Richardson is considered a leader in the Negro Theatre movement. His plays were performed around the country and received countless awards.

Carl Hancock Rux – He is an award-winning poet, playwright, novelist, essayist and recording artist. His work, A City Reimagined: Voices of 9/11 in Poetry and Performance is a tribute to 9/11.

Ishmael Reed – A poet, essayist and novelist, he is best known for Mumbo Jumbo and Flight to Canada. Two of his books were nominated for the National Book Awards and other prizes.

Brenda Jackson – This USA Today and New York Times bestselling romance author has penned more than 100 novels and has more than three million books in print.

Angela Davis – Author of Women, Race, and Class and Are Prisons Obsolete?, Davis is best known for her work in social, civil and women’s rights.

May Miller – Her poem, Blazing Accusation is well known and was written after the 1963 bombing in Birmingham. She is also the award-winning playwright of The Bog Guide and Within the Shadows.

Finally!

Hallelujah!

Finally, finally, the print version of my book, Fuller’s Curse is now available.

Yeah! Hand claps! Yippee! Woo-Hoo!

Please visit one of the following etailers or bookstores (physical) to purchase your copy:

Barnes and Noble
Books A Million
Amazon
IndieBound

My book is priced for every budget and autographs are free! Just come see me at one (or more) of the book signings or appearances listed on the “What’s New?” page on my web site (AnnFields.com) and I’ll be happy to sign your print book. I hope to see you soon and thank you for your interest in my writings.

Love and light to all!

PS: Keep a lookout for the future announcement stating when the Nook, iPad, Sony Reader and Smashwords versions of Fuller’s Curse will be available. Fingers crossed for the end of July!

PSS: Again, my hearty thanks to everyone who has supported me past and present. Words really are inadequate at a time like this when true supporters make themselves known. I love and appreciate you all.

Today is THE Day!

WOW!

I can’t believe April 23rd is really here. I started this publishing journey a year ago and back then 4/23/13 seemed so far off. Now, it’s really here and that means Fuller’s Curse is really here.

My story of accidental deaths, curses, good and evil is now available on Amazon. You can purchase the book for your Kindle, computer or SmartPhone at the low introductory price of $4.99 (limited time).

For those of you who prefer the feel of a physical book in your hands (like me), the print version of Fuller’s Curse will be available in late May. Check back here (www.AnnFields.com) for the actual release date, but I’m shooting for May 23.

And finally, for those of you who refuse to contribute to Amazon taking over the world but prefer ebooks, you will have the option of purchasing your ebook copy of Fuller’s Curse from Kobo, Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, Apple, and other e-tailers by the end of July.

Publishing Schedule:
April 23 – ebook (Amazon) – $4.99
May 23 – print copy – $14.99
July 23 – ebook (Kobo, Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, Apple and other e-tailers) – $4.99 (introductory price)

Book Release Party:
Some of you have been asking about a book release/launch party and I’m happy to tell you plans are underway. I don’t have the exact date yet because the party will be held in conjunction with the release of the print version of Fuller’s Curse. But I can tell you that the book release party will be a party in the fullest sense of the word with giveaways, fun, party pics, displays and more. Check my web site regularly as information will be posted and updated here. I can also tell you that the setting for the party…it will blow your mind! I promise.

Discover Authors Giveaway:
For those of you who entered the Discover Authors drawing for a free book–hold off on purchasing your copy. You may be the winner! Check your email this evening for the official results.

In Gratitude:
Thanks to everyone who has supported me throughout this journey. Publishing is not easy. Writing is not easy. But both are made more enjoyable when the author is in the midst of caring family, friends and associates. God bless you and enjoy Fuller’s Curse.

Compulsively Writing More Fiction 2012 by Author, Kate Policani

I am so happy to feature fellow Discover Authors writer, Kate Policani!

Discover Authors Logo

Kate’s book…
Kate Policani Book Cover

…is now FREE!

Kate Policani has compiled and ordered her useful blog posts from 2012. Kate writes her blog to promote her self-published books and to journal her path through self-publishing. Her experiences can help you to achieve your dream of publishing your book, whether you choose to self-publish, publish traditionally, or just write for your own enjoyment. Kate Policani is a homemaker and compulsive writer from Seattle who writes Fantasy and Science Fiction. She also writes a column for the Seattle Writing Examiner.

Download on Smashwords (all ebook formats)

Download on iTunes

Download on Kobo

Download on Nook

Free PDF Download (from Kate’s website)

Add this one to your library; it’s a must have.