First They Came…

I started my blog six years ago. Back then, September 2012, I was adamant about focusing only on the topics of reading, writing and spirituality. I was definitely not going to write or entertain any posts on the subjects of religion, sex or politics. And for the most part I’ve been true to my mission. However, you may have noticed that I have not posted a new article since December 2017. I hear you saying, “Yeah, we noticed. What’s going on, Ann?” My answer in short…politics, one of the subjects I dearly wanted to avoid. But I no longer have that luxury. America is in crisis, and it has everything to do with the new Hitler regime that is currently in place.

“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”

-Edmund Burke-

I consider myself a good person. I work and contribute to society. I vote and pay taxes. I observe most of the laws (okay, so I have had a few warnings about my speed) and I donate to the less fortunate. But I read, and from my readings I know that many good people allowed Hitler to rise. I know good people allowed him to threaten, destroy and kill. I recognize the evil that has befallen this country, and I refuse to be one of those good people who allows evil to persist. Therefore, for the past six months, I have concentrated my time and efforts on signing petitions, calling my elected officials, writing my representatives, and speaking out. And last but not least, praying, always praying. I must continue these efforts and even escalate them, even at the cost of neglecting my blog and the wonderful blogging community I have come to appreciate and adore. I will continue this fight until democracy is restored in America.

“First They Came” by Martin Niemoller

https://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007392

 

A Merry Reading Holiday to You!

The Longest Nine Months by Carol Balawyder

Longest Nine Months

When I read about the release of this latest installment of “A Getting to Mr. Right” series by Carol Balawyder, I hurried to order my copy. When I received it, I put aside the book I was reading to start right in and I was glad I did. I thoroughly enjoyed this novelette. In fact, there are so many good things to recommend about this story that I decided to give it the 12 Days of Reading treatment.

Day One of Reading – In “The Longest Nine Months,” Campbell and Chand agreed not to have children. But a surprise pregnancy reveals Campbell’s change of heart; she wants the child, and thus I was reminded that “it is acceptable to change one’s mind as long as the change is an authentic one.”

Day Two of Reading – Early in the story, Campbell quits her job and spends much time thinking about her next career move. She doesn’t bow to her husband’s pressure to “find a job, already.” Courage and self-love lead her to the career opportunity that makes her heart sizzle, reminding me that discontent is a symptom; investigate the root cause.

Day Three of Reading – The other series characters, Felicity, Missi and Suzy, make guest appearances in this story. What a treat to read about the updates in their lives; what a treasure to be reunited with them even for a short time.

Day Four of Reading – Like real people, even fictional characters live with regrets and bad decisions. Campbell does but she engages in an annual ritual whereby she acknowledges the mistake while honoring the person she has evolved into. I thought this a healthy, freeing ritual; one to adopt in real life.

Day Five of Reading – I am a fan of culture and diversity and in this story, part of the focus is on India – their food, traditions, family dynamics and fashion; aspects neatly layered into the story, giving the tale freshness and interest.

Day Six of Reading – This is a love story at its core. The story of a man and woman in love, who struggle to overcome major obstacles. Every love story is a human story, and “The Longest Nine Months” hits both notes – love and human.

Day Seven of Reading – I once heard someone say that “authenticity is as necessary as air.” In this story, Campbell makes some pretty bold moves, but she is equipped to do so because she knows herself and makes moves based on her inner needs. For siding with authenticity, she is rewarded.

Day Eight of Reading – One of my favorite scenes in this story is when the friends gather to share conversation and truth. How blessed we are when we have friends who speak truth and share wisdom.

Day Nine of Reading – There’s a reason the story is titled “The Longest Nine Months.” It takes about that much time for Campbell to decide on motherhood and the next phase of her career. She didn’t rush her decision-making. She didn’t fall into desperation. She took her time and in the end, created the right life for her.

Day Ten of Reading – Campbell certainly had her share of difficulties but she looked for the positives in her situations and found them. A reminder that a frown can be turned to a smile with the right attitude.

Day Eleven of Reading – Through Campbell’s long nine month journey, I was reminded that endings and beginnings are connected. In Campbell’s case she experienced several endings that opened the door to beautiful beginnings. Just like in real life.

Day Twelve of Reading – A satisfying ending. That’s what Carol, the author left me with. Carol is an expert at writing engrossing stories that are full of believable characters and challenging story situations. I am so happy to have discovered her line of books and I encourage you to buy “The Longest Nine Months” or any of the stories in her series.

Carol Balawyder

Carol Balawyder

Until next time, have yourself a merry reading holiday!

Thanks, Melissa!

Melissa Embry is one special lady — and writer! We met a few months ago when I conducted a writing workshop for the Mystery Writers of America, Dallas chapter.  I have been trying like the dickens to get back to a meeting because not only is the group filled with experts on how to kill people (for entertainment purposes only) and how to solve crimes (mostly on paper) but also, they know how to have great fun! And the camaraderie within the group is to die for (yes, pun intended!).

But back to Melissa…

Melissa Embry

Melissa Embry, Writer & Author

 

So after my talk, this young lady–Melissa–approaches my table and we have the coolest talk on her short story successes, her detour away from writing short form fiction and her eventual return to it. It was a great interaction. You know how there are some people you feel tied to even after talking to them for only five minutes? Well, Melissa’s that kind of person. Very open. Very honest. Very supportive. Very positive. Let’s see…did I leave out any verys? Oh yeah, very much a woman of her word. She told me she was going to blog about my session and lo and behold…she did.

Check out the thorough blog post she wrote and while you’re at her cyberhome, check out her background (fascinating!) and a few other posts. I promise you it’ll be well worth the extra keystrokes. Don’t forget to introduce yourself. She’s worth meeting.

Thanks, Melissa. You rock!

New (to me) Author Profile

It’s always exciting to meet a new author (new to me anyway) who lives in my vicinity and writes in the same genre (well, almost) as I do. Now you can meet him too…

James Reid

James Reid, Author

I met James Reid through a local writers group – the Writers Guild of Texas, where we are both members. I didn’t know initially we were in the same group because I don’t attend every meeting even though I should given the interesting and educational workshops they conduct. So when I finally attended a meeting (ah-hem!) and met James, we chatted and decided the value of a good writers group is well, invaluable. James followed up our brief discussion of “the value of a good writers group” with a blog post that I found wonderfully affirming.

Please take a moment to cyber-travel to his site and read what he has to say. And when you’re done, hyperlink to Amazon and check out his five-star rated murder mystery, Monsters Behind the Gates. I read it and wow!, two thumbs up.

Back on Track

Since July, I have been trying to blog. I can’t tell you how many posts I’ve started and could not finish. Oh, I had plenty of topics to write about. But either my emotions got in the way and stymied me or my thoughts were so jumbled I could not figure out how to arrange them into form or structure.

In July

I sat down to write a piece on freedom and had planned to post it around the Fourth of July holiday. But I quickly discovered I could not write about freedom when too many people are still not free. How can I espouse life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness—words our founding fathers listed as guaranteed rights for citizens of this country—when people like me cannot get justice in the courts, cannot drive without being stopped for ridiculous reasons, cannot find affordable housing (even with a voucher), cannot even get an elected official to pick up his/her phone and talk to me? How can I celebrate freedom when rigged systems, unfair policies, oppressive practices, and pure hatred enslaves those who are the least, the tired, the poor, the huddled masses yearning to breathe free? No, there was no writing about freedom, independence, or the old red, white and blue. Too much anger. Intense, boiling anger. No blog post.

In August

The last full month of summer arrives and surely that’s a good month to write about reading, writing or spirituality—the three topics I focus on on this site. Surely I am calm enough, loving enough, optimistic enough to write a mid-year status based on the numerology forecast for 2017 . I sit down to write about the numbers forecast for August and how the eclipse plays into that and dog-gone-it, more of the same. Intense emotions (anger, frustration, and at times hopelessness) and thoughts that are spiraling in a thousand different directions. Lord, what’s wrong with me? Surely my only blog post this summer will not be a reading list? (Not that summer reading lists aren’t important. I enjoy scanning lists of beach – or wherever your summer travels take you – reads.) Why can’t I focus? Why is it that every time I sit down to compose a blog post (or even read), my mind splinters – to the current civil war in America (Confederates versus Everyone Else); to the hate spewing from the White House; to protests denouncing indignities and un-Christian policies; to congressional attacks against core rights; to another shooting, another bombing, another natural disaster. Even the stunning eclipse on August 21st could not superimpose its beauty on this country. The moon performed its breathtaking show and seemingly everyone took a break from life to watch and be awed. But only hours after the show ended, what do we encounter? The threat of nuclear war from one country met by threats and bullying from another. It’s enough to bow in despair. No blog post.

In September

It’s been months now with my mind in tatters. Months now during which I can barely communicate verbally (oh, did I forget to mention a Mercury retrograde that had me talking like a toddler) let alone write – even a simple email. “This cannot go on,” I cry out and thankfully my anguish is felt. My angels, my Muse, my God, whatever spiritual being is hovering over me replies, “Pray!”

“What?” I answer back.

“Pray.”

Something opens inside me and all the tension, heartache and dark feelings I had been harboring inside me evaporates. I am immediately reminded that nothing is bigger than God. Not irrational world leaders, not hate-mongers, not climate change, not jumbled and wayward thoughts, not destructive emotions. Nothing. I am immediately reminded that the one true way to God is through prayer. I smile, sit back in my chair, close my eyes, take a few deep breaths, and think

Pray

Never ceasing

Always in the present

Always on time

Always right and appropriate,

Fashionable and in season

Prayer

Pray

To erase hate. To usher in peace.

For love to reign. For equity, justice, and fairness too.

To eliminate us versus them.

To join all in spiritual union.

Pray

Never ceasing

Until that day when ALL sees the ONE as ALL

Pray!

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Thank God, I am back on track!

Summer Reading Underway

Summer Reading 2017

It’s summer! A belated, yet no less warm (no pun intended) welcome to a more relaxed time, a time when reading figures more prominently in the schedule. At least for me it does and I attribute that to a lighter work load, but mostly to that glorious week called summer vacation. During that wonderful week of disconnecting from the daily grind of life, I have been known to finish up to three books (mostly fiction, 300 pages or less). So in anticipation of my summer vacation (and the reading I’ll do before and after that), I compiled my reading list, ordered my books, and have them neatly stacked, waiting on me. Take a look below at my “goodies” and let me know how your list compares. I’m always on the lookout for great reads (thanks Shamira for last year’s referral!).

Ann’s Summer Reading List – 2017

The Island of Lost Children by Kim Batchelor – A tale that reimagines (who introduced this word into our current language?) the friendship between Peter Pan, the lovable boy who flies and Wendy, the lovable girl who cherishes books. A favorite for adults and children!

The Roux in the Gumbo by Kim Robinson – A multi-generational family saga that traces the lineage of a Louisiana family from slavery to present day. Reminiscent of “Roots” and “Cane River,” it is a long read but quite entertaining.

The Writer and the Rake by Shehanne Moore – A love story that is no doubt all the title promises it to be. A time-traveling, wanna-be bestselling author changes a gentleman of dubious character into a hero. Or does she? Hmmmm, I already feel heat rising from this one.

Shadow of the Final Storm by Carol Craver – This is a story of family intrigue narrated by a ghost. Yes, a ghost! Think “The Lovely Bones” and you’re almost there. There’s no time like summer to prepare for Halloween!

Letters to Yeyito by Paquito d’Rivera – As a nod to my upcoming vacation locale, I am anxious to read about one of Cuba’s most legendary musician, Paquito d’Rivera. In this abbreviated memoir, he writes about music, career, expulsion from Cuba and life in America. I have a feeling this one is going to be a keepsake.

American Dervish by Ayad Akhtar – To get a jump on my fall reading, I’ll finish my summer reading with our book group’s selection for September. This book tells the story of a Pakistani boy growing up in America with struggles that center around identity and religion.

So again, how does your summer reading list compare? What other titles would you recommend?

Happy summer! Happy reading!

PS: During the time it took to create and post this entry, I finished the first two books on my reading list. Please check Amazon and Goodreads for the reviews I wrote about the books.

The Final Spotlight

Hello one and all! I’m back with the final installation on my series featuring women writers.

For the past few months I have been profiling the women writers who I am blessed to share publishing credit with in volume two of Voices from the Block. I’m not going to say I saved the best for last because all the women are simply amazing. As is Dawn Adams, today’s featured writer. Below is the interview I conducted with Dawn. I am so pleased to share it with you.

  1. What prompted you to pursue writing as a creative outlet? I was a voracious reader as a kid, so I guess it was rather natural for me to write as well. I was always jotting down thoughts, stories, phrases and poems that popped into my head.

 

  1. How do you get in the writing mood? I don’t have any type of ritual. As a matter of fact, I tend to write in spurts. My tag name is Nightwriter, which comes from a habit I have of waking up in the middle of the night and grabbing the notepad and pen on the bedside table and writing. A majority of my works have been sparked around two or three in the morning.

 

  1. How do you know when a poem, short story, novel, etc. is “finished?” It varies for me. There are times when I write straight through from concept to completion and I just know it’s done because it came together seamlessly and there is a peace about everything on the page. But there are the times when it comes one line at a time with days, weeks, months and even years in between before it all comes together.

 

  1. What or who has been your greatest writing influence? Oh, there’s not just one. There’s Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Alice Walker, Maya Angelou, Nikki Giovanni, Stephen King, Carolyne Keene, Dr. Seuss, and the list goes on.

 

  1. Do you have a preferred writing form? Poetry, short story, scripts, essays, etc.? Poetry was my first love but I enjoy writing children’s stories and scripts also. I have yet to master the short story; however, I’m working on it.
Dawn Pic

Dawn Adams

 

 

 

  1. What are your future writing plans? I have a couple of contemporary adult novels and a children’s book series in the works currently.

 

  1. What do you say to people who tell you, “I want to write a book?” Just do it!

 

  1. What was your first thought when you held your first published work in your hands? (Silence)

 

  1. What was the most challenging thing about the publishing process for you? What was the most rewarding? The most challenging, I think, were the deadlines. I missed a few and had to negotiate additional time. The most rewarding was the feedback, I received. It’s always humbling to hear that something I’ve written has connected with someone in a deep and lasting way.

 

  1. How/What do you feel about the future of publishing? We’re in the digital era, which is great. I have Kindle and Nook apps on my phones, computers and tablets, so I understand the convenience and appreciate it. We have access to more content than ever before and from virtually anywhere in the world. But I’m still old school. I love the feel and smell of books, so my hope is that they never go away. When I think about the publishing process, I see self-publishing gaining even more prominence in the industry and becoming the norm. It has lost the stigma that was once attached to it. And in this age, where everyone wants to tell their story their way, self-publishing gives them the control that is not available in the traditional model, and that is encouraging to many would-be authors.

So now you know what I know. Dawn is not only a talented writer but also a poet, editor, trainer, cheerleader, philosopher, yoga practitioner, mother, entrepreneur, and so much more. I guarantee when you read her poetry in Voices you’ll be impressed.

I hope you enjoyed this series on women writers. It certainly put many smiles on my face to present it. If your summer reading list still has an open spot, I ask you to consider adding Voices from the Block. Thank you in advance, and happy reading!